Prometheus 6

All fun, but no games.

Congress Never Learns: The Same Over And Over

cnlTHE LAST election demonstrated that no matter how dissatisfied the voters are with the politics of avoidance and fiscal irresponsibility, their representatives have little fear of losing office. Of the 405 members of the House of Representatives who faced re-election in 1990, 82 were unchallenged by a major-party candidate; another three hundred faced a major-party opponent who raised less than $25,000 in campaign funds. Frustrated voters-both Republicans and Democrats-are rebelling against unaccountable lawmakers by considering constitutional amendments to limit the number of consecutive terms a state legislator or a congressman can serve.

At the same time, the eminent historian …

How To Avoid Hard Drive Recovery Costs

Getting a hard drive failed is a disastrous situation for most of us especially if we have data on it which matters a lot to us. Getting your hard drive repaired and data recovered through a professional hard drive recovery service is not always that easily because you might not be willing to pay the high hard drive recovery cost to these professional services. However, luckily, there are a few instances where you can try to avoid hard drive recovery cost by taking some simple and safe steps. You may stand a good chance of recovering data on your …

Armand Hammer: Suspect Icon

ahmTHE DEATH of Armand Hammer last month was marked by unrestrained encomia. In addition to a full-page obituary, the New York Times published an editorial that lauded the multi-millionaire’s keen eye for art,” his bold business sense,” his “restless intelligence and prodigious energy.” The editorial went on to praise his “tireless efforts to improve relations between the United States and the Soviet Union.” Somewhat bafflingly, the piece concluded with the tribute that Hammer was probably the only American who could have told Mr. Gorbachev what Lenin was really like.” Quite why Mr. Gorbachev would particularly want an American to …

An Ugly What-If?

bobMAGINE that Germany has won the Battle of Britain, and that Britain has fallen under Nazi occupation. The British government and the royal family escape to Canada and continue defiance. But the Germans install a quisling government which gradually puts down roots. With every passing year the influence and authority of the exile institutions diminish. After years of enforced silence in Britain even the memory of their existence all but disappears.

Then imagine that after years of humiliation and ridicule, the government and the royal family return to Buckingham Palace and are greeted by jubilant crowds. At a …

William Bennett: Could Have Been A Contender

wbIT’S NOT OFTEN that one man makes himself so felt by his absence as William Bennett has done. Less than a week after he withdrew his name from consideration as Republican National Committee chairman, the White House showed how much it will miss him. The first sign came on December 12, when the President awoke to the news that an assistant secretary of education, Michael Williams, had issued a directive banning all federally funded colleges from setting aside scholarships based exclusively on race. That may not seem all that remarkable for a Republican Administration whose platform pledged to “resist …

Old Bush Learned Lessons For New Bush

shiiIf sanctions were a function of economics, ours against Saddam would be bound to work. But sanctions are only as good as the threat of war behind them.

WILL ECONOMIC sanctions against Saddam Hussein work? What are the risks of waiting to find out? The agonizing truth about this debate is that neither side can prove its case until the President has made an irrevocable decision. Such is the burden of the statesman.

CIA Director William Webster’s congressional testimony regarding the impact of sanctions did not prejudge the policy question but stated the truth as best we can know …

Nickel And Paradigm’d To Death

pdsIN The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn used the term “paradigm shift” to describe scientific advance. Mrs. Thatcher and Mr. Reagan will stand forever as the Copernicus and Galileo of political economy-courageous visionaries whose leadership overturned a decadent orthodoxy. Our challenge is to complete the revolution. New ideas are noisy, but they are essential for a new age.

Some of the momentum for these new ways of thinking derives from permanent, structural changes in our world. For example, George Orwell was certainly right about the bleak soul of totalitarianism, but he was wrong about the centralizing impact …

Oakeshott: Hard To Forget

moMICHAEL OAKESHOTT established modesty as a philosophical principle, indeed as a category of being. At the same time, and not paradoxically, he was a towering figure. Among other things, he was the most important political thinker in the Anglo-Saxon tradition since Burke (and I have not overlooked J. S. Mill).

Michael Oakeshott was the guest of honor at NR’s twentieth-anniversary celebration, the proceedings that year taking place in two parts. First was an address by Oakeshott at Hunter College, and later a banquet at the Plaza Hotel. When we received Oakeshott’s paper at the NR office, it proved to …

The First Time Democrats Stood Up Against Bush, They Were Wrong

dsuabA GROUP of House and Senate Democrats sues in federal court to bar President Bush from attacking Iraq without congressional approval. An opposing group of House Democrats establishes a hawkish organization calling for the elimination of Saddam Hussein. High-rankin senators growl publicly: Ted Kennedy sees a congressional “acquiescence in war”; Pat Moynihan lambastes “those sitting there in their white robes drinking coffee and urging us to war”; Sam Nunn warns of “American boys being sent and brought back in body bags.”

Welcome to one of the most under reported stories of recent months: the Democratic Party’s disarray over the …

Kuwait Lessons Still Ring True 20+ Years On

klsFOR THE TACTICIAN the desert is heaven. For the logistician it is hell.” This is the conclusion of General Ali Belal, the amiable commander of Egypt’s forty-thousand-man force in Saudi Arabia. He has fought in five desert wars-four in the Sinai and one in Yemen-and served as an advisor to the Iraqi army during its ten-year war with Iran.

He is squatting down for a lunch of roasted lamb with one of his commando units and a few U.S. Army officers wearing the crossed arrows of the Special Forces. They are in an isolated camp on the flat, empty …